Col. Joseph Bell of Carteret County

Excerpts from:
Colonel Joseph Bell of Carteret County
And Some of His Descendants

(transcribed as written)
 Foreward

 Mary “Polly” Thompson 
Greenfield Bell
3rd wife of Caleb Norris Bell 
(Family Photo - ancestry.com)
Caleb Norris Bell 1788-1872
Son of Caleb Bell 1731-1811
G-son of Joseph 1695-1777  
(Family Photo - ancestry.com) 

Since I first became interested in the Bell family I have made trips to Norfolk and Princess Anne Counties, Virginia, and to Currituck, Carteret and Craven Counties, North Carolina; and have searched the land grants at the Land Grant Office and many manuscript records on deposit at the North Carolina State Department of Archives and History. I have also visited the homes of many descendants of Colonel Joseph Bell in Carteret County in the search for family Bibles and cemetery inscriptions. This genealogy has been compiled from the records accumulated in this search. It is my hope that it will be of use to the Bell descendants, many of whom are scattered throughout the United States. -Marybelle Delamar, Raleigh, North Carolina 1946

On February 22, 1713/14, Ross Bell was granted 275 acres of land on the White Oak River Joseph Bell, 370 acres joining Ross Bell; and George Bell, 280 acres in Newport Sound (Land Grant Office, Book 2, pp 387/8). No precinct is stated in the grants, but subsequent records prove the land to have been located in the territory which became Carteret Precinct, and later Carteret County. These three Bells were closely associated and were probably brothers. They do not enter into this genealogy, but mention is made of them since it has been proven that this Joseph Bell was the brother of Andrew and, therefore, uncle of our Joseph and the names might furnish a clue for further search and as an aid in identifying Andrew, the father of Joseph. One George Bell had a grant in "New Currituck" in 1707 (Land Grant Office, Book 1. p 166). This is the only precinct in which Andrew Bell is known to have resided, and was the precinct in which Joseph, the son of Andrew, lived at least for a while.

Only such search has been made for these early Bells as has been necessary in clearing the records of the two Joseph Bells - uncle and nephew. The older Joseph was actively engaged in county affairs until his death in the spring of 1745, having served as justice, vestryman, commissioner of the town of Beaufort, and perhaps in other capacities. His wife was Margaret, as shown in the Carteret County Court Minutes of September 7, 1725, in the minutes of September, 1734, when Joseph Bell, Esq. made oath that he had in his family, Joseph Bell; Margaret Bell, wife; Elisabeth and Thomas Bell, and Prudence Stephens; and again in his will made in 1744.

ANDREW BELL, acquired land in Currituck County on July 27, 1708, through an assignment by Thomas Williams, and nothing more is known of him until December 18, 1716, when Joseph Bell, "Son and Heir of Andrew Bell," was granted at least part of the same land (Land Grant Office, Book 111-B, p 119, and Book 8, p 139. Currituck County Deed Book 3, pp 88/89). In addition to Joseph, the known children of Andrew Bell were George, born June 4, 1709, and Josiah, born in 1711. Their ages were given in the Carteret County Court Minutes of September 7, 1725, when Mr. Joseph Bell produced two orphan sons of his brother Andrew Bell and had them bound to serve him and his wife Margaret until they should come severally of age. The loss of the court minutes, estate papers, and many other records of Currituck for this early period, has made it impossible to learn more about the family while in that precinct.

JOSEPH BELL, must have been of age when he was granted the land in 1716 as heir of his father and, therefore, born not later than 1695. Nothing is known of him, however, from 1716 until 1729. He probably was living in Currituck County on the land that had acquired. In July, 1729, as a resident of Norfolk County he purchased of John Prescott and wife Elizabeth, land on the north west landing in Norfolk County. So far as is known he resided in Norfolk County until 1738, or shortly prior thereto, when he removed to Carteret County, North Carolina, where he made his permanent home.

When he first located in Carteret he evidently leased land on Newport Sound from Christopher Dudley of Onslow County. The first identified record of him in Carteret comes through a deed made on December 7, 1736, by Christopher Dudley, when he sold to Joseph Bell, junior, land now in the occupation of the said Bell. The "junior" was to distinguish him from the uncle of the same name. He was known as junior until the death of this uncle early in 1745.

On January 2, 1738, residing in Carteret, Joseph Bell made a deed to Solomon Etheridge for the Currituck land (Currituck County Deed Book 3, p 3). Mary, his wife, signed the deed with him. The sale of this property completes the identification of this Joseph as the son of Andrew, the only other Joseph Bell in Carteret at that time having a wife Margaret and it has been shown that he was the brother of Andrew. In July 1739 Joseph sold part of the Norfolk County land to Willis Wilson, Jr. (Norfolk County Deed Book I, p 89). However, he still owned part of it when he made his will in 1775 and devised it to his son Andrew, who in turn left it to his son Lovett Bell.

Joseph Bell had married in Princess Anne County, Virginia, perhaps not long after her father made his will on October 12, 1720, Mary Corbett, daughter of Richard Corbett and wife Frances Poole. There is a long agreement in the Princess Anne courthouse (Deed Book 7, p 600), dated February 16, 1754, between Joseph Bell and Mary Fazackerly in regard to some slaves which Richard Corbett had left to his two daughters, Abigail and Mary Corbett. This agreement shows that Abigail married Thomas Fazackerly, died and left the one child Mary Fazackerly, and that Mary Corbett married Joseph Bell.

Frances Corbett, widow of Richard Corbett and mother of Mary Bell, either removed from Princess Anne County, Virginia, to Carteret County or was on a visit there when she died in the latter county early in 1744, as her will was proven in Carteret County, March term 1744, by Prudence Phelps who certified that she also saw Steven Costen and Joseph Bell, junior, sign. The will has not been found.

Joseph Bell began to take an active part in public affairs not long after he settled in Carteret, and was soon a leader in the civic, religious, and military life of the county. Some of the positions in which he served were that of justice of the county court for thirty-six years beginning in 1741, with some intermissions when holding other positions; sheriff in 1742, and for several other years later) representative of the county in the legislature 1746-60, 1764-65, and in 1769 (North Carolina Manual, 1913); vestryman almost continuously from 1752; and as lieutenant colonel and later became lieutenant colonel of the county militia. There is no record of how early he became lieutenant colonel.

In the book, Governors Office Records, Lists of Taxables, Militia, and Magistrates 1754-1770, the first list of militia officers is not dated, but the dates for the justices are from 1755 to 1760. This list carries Thomas Lovick as Colonel Joseph Bell, Lieut. Colonel; and David Shepard, Major. The names of the officers on February 24, 1764, were: Joseph Sell, Colonel; David Shepard, Lieut. Colonel; Joseph Fulford, Major; Andrew Bell, Captain; and Caleb Bell, Lieutenant. Joseph's name is not given in the list of officers and men on duty when the Spaniards invaded Beaufort in the summer of 1747, but on April 20 of that year he had asked permission of the vestry for time to settle his accounts as sheriff, "he being going on a voyage to Virginia". He was probably still in Virginia during the "Spanish Alarm" and therefore it cannot be determined what his rank was at that time.

Through the years he accumulated various tracts of land on the Newport River and on Bogue Sound, and property in Beaufort. On May 20, 1755, he gave to the church wardens and vestry land on the southwest side of Newport River for a new chapel "which is now a building." This chapel later was known as Bell's Chapel, and after the Revolution it was used as a Methodist chapel. It must have been located a few miles west of the present Morehead City, just east of Mansfield, as the cemetery in which members of the Bell family are buried is immediately in front of Morehead Villa. Colonel Bell became a resident of Beaufort at least by June 1766, when as an "Inhabiter of this Town" he was granted license for an "ordinary", a license that was renewed from year to year. He was active until near the very end of his life, as he was appointed overseer of the road in March 1777, and in that same court the new commissions from Governor Caswell for justices were recorded, and included him as well as his son Joseph.

In his will, dated January 15, 1775, and proven on June 17, 1777, Colonel Joseph Bell named son Andrew Bell, Elizabeth his wife, and their sons and daughters; son Caleb Bell, Susanna his wife, and their sons and daughters; son Joseph Bell and Hannah his wife, grandson Elijah Bell and the rest of son Joseph's children; son Malachi Bell, Elizabeth his wife, and the sons and daughters of son Malachi; grandson David Bell, son of Church Bell; granddaughter Sarah Bell; grandson Joseph Corbett Bell. In one paragraph he made it clear that Church was the oldest son, then Andrew, Caleb, Joseph and Malachi in the order given. In addition he made disposition of slaves made over to Mary Fazackerly in Princess Ann County, Virginia, by a bond "now in my house," if they should ever return to the family.

This genealogy is being traced through Joseph, the fourth son of Colonel Joseph, but before proceeding with this line, such information as has been gathered of the other sons is being given as a matter of interest to the many descendants. The information given of the sons of Colonel Joseph other than Joseph is not based on any exhaustive research, but on documents incidentally accumulated while making the other search.

CHURCH BELL, the oldest son of Colonel Joseph Bell, married Sarah, daughter of David Shepard, and there was one child, David. Church Bell died prior to June court, 1755, when administration on his estate was granted to his widow Sarah, with Colonel Joseph Bell and Major David Shepard securities. By the March term 1756, Joseph Bell was granted the guardianship of David Bell, orphan of Church. Sarah, the widow, had already married, or soon thereafter married Valentine Wallace, who was granted administration on the estate of Church Bell in right of his wife by an order of June session 1756. David Shepard made a deed of gift for land to his grandson David Bell, on June 6, 1774. (Carteret County Deed Book HI [?], p 76), and named his daughter Sarah Wallace in his will dated May 30, 1774, and probated January 13, 1775. A careful check has not been made, but seemingly it was this David Bell who made his will on December 4, 1783, and named wife Betsey, son David, and daughters Sarah and Elisabeth Bell, with Joseph Bell as executor.

ANDREW BELL, the second son of Colonel Joseph Bell, was active in the affairs of Carteret County prior to March 26, 1787, when as a resident of Craven, he transferred lot No. 53 in Beaufort to Thomas Austin and wife Frances.

Andrew married Elizabeth Lovett, daughter of John. She was born in 1736, died October 9, 1836, and was buried in the William Sanders lot in Cedar Grove cemetery, New Bern. The late Colonel John Whitford remembered her and in a manuscript written about 1900 when he was a very old man, described her personal appearance, and said that she was related to the Shepards of New Bern. The descendants of Andrew have family records that she was, Elisabeth Lovett. Andrew Bell made his will in Craven County on July 28, 1790, and named wife Elizabeth; daughters Sarah and Frances; grandsons John Johnson and George Cooper; sons Lovett, Joseph and Williams; and daughters Esther, Elizabeth and Mary. He specified also that if son Church did not return within five years that his part was to be divided between other children.

CALEB BELL, the third son of Colonel Joseph Bell, married Susannah Coale, daughter of Captain William Coale. The latter made a deed of gift to his son-in-law Caleb Bell on March 8, 1772. He also named his daughter Susannah Bell in his will of August 22, 1774, and made Caleb one of the executors.

Caleb first appeared as a vestryman in 1762, and frequently thereafter. No search has been made of the records for his other activities. He died in 1811, and left sons Jacob, Joseph Cole (Coale), Caleb Norris, William, and daughters Charlotte Chadwick, Elizabeth Bell, and Abigal Chadwick. Those children and a grandson, Caleb Bell son of William, were all named in his will made on April 1, 1811 and proven June term 1811.

Jacob and Caleb Norris Bell, sons of Caleb, both became Methodist preachers. According to A.H. Bedford, in THE HISTORY OF METHODISM IN KENTUCKY (Southern Methodist Publishing House. 1870), Caleb Norris Bell married first Judith H. Moore, May 3, 1815, of Nottoway County, Virginia, by whom he had three children; second, Jane Browder, Sept. 6, 1820, of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, where he then resided; and third, after he had settled in Todd County, Kentucky, Mrs. Mary Greenfield, Oct. 16, 1837. Caleb was born June 8, 1788, and was still living in 1870.

MALACHI BELL, the fifth and youngest son of Colonel Joseph Bell and wife Mary Corbett, was probably born between 1745 and 1750. Search has not been made to find how early he acquired land, served on juries or as justice. However, he was chosen a vestryman at a meeting of St. John's Vestry on Easter Monday in the year 1774, and at the same time was appointed one of the commissioners to receive certain moneys for building the church in Beaufort and to agree with some person to carry on the work. His service as vestryman continued through the last meeting of Juno 19, 1776. He qualified as a justice in June 1777.

His first appointment as an officer during the Revolutionary period was that of second major of the Carteret County Minute Men made by the Provincial Congress held at Hillsboro in August, 1775; next as Lieutenant Colonel; and on July 3, 1779, Colonel Thomas Chadwick having resigned, Malachi Bell was promoted to colonel of the Carteret regiment. He served also as commissioner of specific tax, 1780-82. (North Carolina Colonial Records, Vol. X, beginning p 164; North Carolina State Records, Vol. XIV, pp 317-323i North Carolina Revolutionary Accounts, Vol. IV-63-4, and Book H, p 94). He was one of the commissioners for Old Topsail Inlet navigation (North Carolina State Records, Vol. XIV. 602-510), 1783; a member of the Convention of 1789; and a member of the State Legislature from Carteret County 1789-91, the first term in the House and the last two terms in the Senate.

He married, first, Elizabeth Coale, daughter of Captain William Coale, who in his will of August 22, 1774, named (among others) his daughter Elizabeth Bell and son-in-law Malachi Bell. When Malachi made his will in 1803 his wife was Sarah. She was the daughter of Joseph Fulford, and widow of George Robertson who died in 1781 and left her with three sons, Archibald, Joseph, and Terringim Robertson (Carteret Co. Wills, Inventories, etc. 1741-1887, pp 42-46. Deed Book P, part 1, p 11). The index to Carteret County deeds shows that Elizabeth signed a deed with Malachi recorded in March, 1772. She was still his wife when David was born on April 26, 1782 (the David Bell Bible). No later record of her has been found. Since there is no indication either in the will or in the court minutes that any of Malachi’s children were minors, they were probably all by the first wife.

Malachi Bell died between September 22, 1803, when the will was made, and February term of court 1804, when it was probated. The children named were Josiah, Malachi, William Cole (Coale), and David Bell, Sarah Robertson, Susanna Leecraft and her children, and grandchildren Nancy Fulford and Malachi Robertson. Susannah Leecraft was the widow of Benjamin Leecraft, who had died about 1799. She died in 1818 and left a will in which she named one son, Benjamin Leecraft, daughters Elizabeth Roberson, Susan Verell, Nancy Perry, and Mary Manson, grandson Benjamin Leecraft Perry, and brother Josiah Bell.

Since Benjamin Leecraft who married Susannah Bell was the founder of the family in Carteret County, all Leecraft descendants in and from the county are descendants of Colonel Joseph Bell and of his son Malachi. Among the many names are Perry, Manson, Robertson, Hellen, Willis and Chadwick.

Josiah Bell, oldest son of Malachi and wife Elisabeth Coale, married Mary (Polly) Fisher, daughter of William, bond dated August 15, 1793. They were both named in the will of her father, Sept. 15, 1820.

Josiah Fisher Bell, youngest son of Josiah and wife Mary Fisher, was born about 1821 (1860 census), and married Susan Benjamin Leecraft, bond dated November 25, 1841. The family was listed in the 1860 census of Carteret County as follows: Josiah F. Bell 39, occupation farmer, value of real estate 9,000, value of personal estate 20,000, Susan 39, Mary 16, Julia 14, Eugene 11, Susan 6, Evlin 1. Of these children, Mary married Charles Chadwick and died without issue; Julia married Charles Chadwick after the death of her sister Julia, and left
children Clay, Stephen and Herbert; Eugene married Emma Bell of Wildwood, and left Issue; Susan, whose full name was Susan Ann, married Lafayette Finley Willis, son of Elijah Willis and wife Cordelia Wade. (Marriage bond of Elijah Willis and Cordelia Wade dated Dec. 1, 1856, with notation that they were married December 8, 1856, by Josiah P. Bell, J.P.; Census 1870). Lafayette Finley W i l l i s and wife Susan Ann left several children, among them, Susan Cordelia who married Joseph Murray Delamar. The Evlin given in the census was Mary Evelyn, born June 29, 1859, and married November 28, 1878, John Spence West Hellen, son of Bryan Hellen and wife Emiline Rumley Hellen (Family records furnished by Miss Bertha Leecraft Hellen, Raleigh, N.C.) There are a number of descendants.

JOSEPH BELL II, fourth son of Colonel Joseph Bell and wife Mary Corbett, and the son for whom this search principally has been made, was born December 6, 1739, and died February 13, 1813. He married, about May 1762, Hannah Lovett, daughter of John Lovett, born in 1750 and died September 28, 1795. Joseph and his wife were buried in the cemetery located immediately in front of Morehead Villa, supposedly Bell's Chapel Cemetery, with stones still standing. Joseph married second, November 8, 1796, Jane Davis (Marriage Bond). There is no marriage bond for Joseph Bell and Hannah Lovett, but his great granddaughter Hannah Bell (Murray) Sabiston knew that her grandmother was Hannah Lovett, and so stated; also that her grandfather, Elijah Bell, named a daughter for his mother. This last statement is substantiated by an entry in the William Robertson Bible that Hannah Lovett Bell, daughter of Elijah and wife Mary, was born March 22, 1803. At that time Elijah's mother had been dead for only eight years and his father was still living. There are indications of this marriage also in the county records. John Lovett was of Craven County, where he died in 1769, and where his estate was administered. Elizabeth Bell, older sister of Hannah, had married Andrew Bell, and that no doubt accounts for the fact that Hannah was put under the guardianship of Andrew Bell of Carteret County, May term, 1762. Andrew Bell came into court and prayed to have the bond given for the guardianship of Hannah Lovett, orphan of John, and it was ordered that the clerk "give him up the same." Evidently Hannah had already married Joseph Bell, although according to exact date of birth is not given on the stone and she could have been somewhat older than was known at the time of her death. Other Lovett-Bell items are contained in the court minutes of Carteret County. There was a court order August term 1763 showing that John Lovett, an orphan, had been directed into the care of Joseph Bell, junior, and another that John Lovett, orphan of John, late of Craven County, chose Joseph Bell, Esq. his guardian; also one in November 1763 that with the consent of his guardian, John Lovett was bound to Joseph Bell, junior.

There were no marriage bonds for any of Colonel Joseph Bell's sons during colonial days. The family was too active in the affairs of the Anglican Church not to have conformed strictly to the laws of the church and of England. Bonds were not required of those who posted bonds, and that is one of the reasons for bonds being missing for whole families, especially in colonial times.

The name of Joseph Bell II, called junior to distinguish his from his father, first appeared in the minutes of St, John's Vestry of March 31, 1766, when he was paid for "Heading Divine Service" at Beaufort Town for the year 1765. After that one of his almost constant occupations seems to have been that of "Reader" throughout the Colonial period. In 1772 and perhaps during other years, he signed deeds as one of the commissioners for Port Beaufort; served as justice beginning with September 1774; and as overseer of the poor from 1778 through 1783, a part of which time he was county warden. In the county records he was designated at times as tailor and at others as planter, and at least once, he was associated with Benjamin Leecraft in ship building (Carteret County Deed Book L, p 229, Jan. 29, 1786). No search has been made for his civic and business activities for later periods.

He made his will on December 31, 1812, and it was probated in May 1813. He named wife Jane; grandsons William Roberson Bell, Elijah Bell, and Gibbons Bell, children of son Elijah Bell deceased; daughter Mary Chadwick; son Joseph Corbett Bell and wife Hannah for their support and the support of two grandchildren, Joseph Bell and Ward Bell, the children of said son Joseph C. Bell, and for any other that shall be born to him and his wife Hannah; son Church Bell; daughter Nancy Elliott (she was the wife of Thomas Elliott), her son Joseph Bell Elliott and her daughter Hannah Lovett Elliott; daughters Sarah Bell and Jane Bell; daughter Kitturah Bell, her husband Malachi Bell, and their daughter Permeley; daughter Hannah Davis, and her children Solomon and Polley Davis.

To the above children he left land and slaves, some of which land he stated came to him by his father Joseph Bell, and he further identifies himself as the son of Colonel Joseph Bell by referring to the agreement between his father and Thomas and Mary Fazackerly as mentioned in his father's will.

ELIJAH BELL, son of Joseph Bell and wife Hannah Lovett, was born November 18, 1765, and married December 12, 1792, Mary Gibbons, born in Virginia May 8, 1780, the daughter of Captain William Gibbons of the Island of New Providence and his wife Ann Robertson, and the granddaughter of William Robertson and wife Mary Arthurs (Bible Records). The legatees named in the will of Elijah Bell, made January 20, 1809 and proven in December 1809, were wife Mary, sons William Robertson, Elijah, and Gibbons; daughters Nancy and Hannah Bell. The executor's were father Joseph Bell, brother-in-law James Chadwick, and son William Robertson Bell.

After the death of Elijah Bell, Mary ((Gibbons) Bell married James E. Gibble, born November 25, 1785, and died December 6, 1860, son of Dedrick Gibble and wife Mary Easton. Sarah Gibble, the sister of James S. Gibble, married John Rumley, and recorded the birth and death of her brother in her Bible, now in possession of Miss Ann Rumley of Beaufort. Mary Gibble, the wife of James E. Gibble and mother of Elijah Bell's children, died December 31, 1857. The dates of birth of two of the children of Elijah Bell and wife Mary Gibbons (Hannah Lovett and Elijah) were entered in the William Robertson Bible and the others in the Thomas Murray Bible as following; William Roberson Bell, born August 29, 1794; Elijah Bell, born August 18, 1797; Nancy Roberson Bell, born September 26, 1799; Hannah Lovett Bell, born March 22, 1803; Gibbons Bell, born September 11, 1807. There was no uniformity about the spelling of the name Robertson among the descendants of William Robertson.

NANCY ROBERSON BELL, the daughter of Elijah Bell and wife Mary Gibbons, was born September 28, 1799, and died August 16, 1884. She married November 2, 1815, Thomas Murray, son of Bartholomew Murray and wife Martha Dudley, who was born October 6, 1795, and died October 5, 1868. "Captain” Thomas Murray was a merchant, who had served for a short time in Captain Joseph Henry's Company as private and ensign, and also in John
Oliver's Company, at Port Hampton, following his enlistment on July 12, 1813. (Pension record).

The children of Thomas Murray and wife Nancy Robertson (Bell) Murray, in addition to those who died young, were:

I - Martha Dudley Murray, born December 18, 1819; married August 3, 1841, Captain Thomas Thomas (Bible records and marriage bond). Their remembered children were, Murray, married Laura Pelletier; Alonso, married first Rosa Manney, daughter of Dr. James L. Manney and first wife Julia Ann Fulford, and second, Nannie Davis; Samuel, married Betty Bell from Harlowe; and Isabella (Bell), who married Benjamin Midgett. Only Alonso and Murray left descendants. Samuel was the last Confederate soldier to die in Carteret County.

II - Thomas Dudley Murray, born December 21, 1822; married March 13, 1845, Mary Ann Magee, daughter of John and Canaday Magee, born in Ireland May 15, 1826, and died in Beaufort August 23, 1871. Their children were, Nancy Bell Murray ("Cousin Nan"), born January 19, 1846, who married James Hollister Potter and left many descendants; and Thomas J. Murray who married Mary F, Thompson who was born October 7, 1852. He was drowned at Ocracoke on December 22, 1871, just a short time after his marriage. Mary F. (Thompson) Murray married second, Winfield Chadwick. Other children of Thomas Dudley Murray and Mary Magee died young.

III - Hannah Bell Murray, born October 31, 1832 (she was the second child of this name, the first having died); married March 3, 1857, John T. Sabiston. There were a number of children who died young. The two to marry and have issue were Hannah Bell Sabiston (known to all relatives as Sis Bell), born December 25, 1861; married the Reverend N. M. Jurney, and has for many years made her home in Mount Olive, North Carolina, being the only member of the family of her generation still living; and Mattie Sabiston, who married first John Jones and second, Seth Gibbs from Hyde County.

IV - Mary Gibbons Murray, born February 27, 1827 (an older daughter of the name had died on March 13, 1826); married first, August 25, 1846, Robert Sabiston, and second, October 25, 1856, Joseph Borden Dickinson. By the marriage to Robert Sabiston there were two children, Mary Elizabeth, born January 27, 1848, and William, born March 8, 1851. Mary Elizabeth (“Aunt Mamie”) married John Mayo of Washington, N.C. Willam married first Sally _____ and second Fanny ____. The Murray Bible carries the birth record of Elizabeth L. Sabiston, daughter of William Sabiston and Sallie his wife, June 7, 1877, but none of his other children are listed. By the marriage with Joseph Borden Dickinson, Mary Gibbons Murray had two children, Cora Nelson Dickinson, born August 2, 1857, died January 28, 1933; and an unnamed daughter born on November 15 and died November 17, 1858. Mary Gibbons Dickinson died November 16, 1858, when the last child was one day old. Joseph B. Dickinson married second, October 25, 1860, Tryphenia Haskett, and third, _____Culley. Having lost her mother when she was a little more than one year of age, Cora N. Dickinson lived with her grandparents, Thomas and Nancy Murray until her father’s second marriage, as did also the two Sabiston children. Cora N. Dickinson married October 19, 1876, Selden Dawson Delamar, son of Christopher Francis Delamar and wife Susan Gibble Delamar.
 

Some miscellaneous documentation

June court 1774 – Joseph Bell granted license to keep Ordinary at his own dwelling house in Beaufort Town – Thomas Chadwick bondsman.

Meeting at the courthouse in Beaufort 1st day of April 1771 – Collector of the Parrish ordered to pay Andrew Bell the sum of one pound for Reading Divine Service at the Chapel on Newport River.
 

Will of Joseph Bell made 15th day of January 1775 
probated June court 1777 Carteret County

In the name of God, amen, I Joseph Bell, of Carteret County, in the Province of North Carolina, Gent., being in a low State of health and calling to mind the frail state of men, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following: viz. I recommend my soul unto the hands of the Almighty God that gave it me and my body to the Earth from whence it came.

Item. I give and bequeath unto ay son Andrew Bell a tract of land which I bought of Col. Thos. Lovick and George Read which did formerly belong to the estate of James Winwright, deceased, the said land lying en Little Creek on the forth side of Newport River and joining to my son Andrew's land upon Slack Creek, also one lot of land at the North West landing in Norfolk County In Virginia, to him his heirs and assigns forever. Also my will and desire is that ay son Andrew Bell and Elizabeth his wife shall have the use and service of the negroes as follows, viz. Argail, Daniel, Creasy, Lucy, and Tamer, during my sons natural life and his wife's widowhood, and then I give and bequeath the said negroes and their increase to ay grandchildren, the sons and daughters of my son Andrew Bell to be divided when the youngest child comes to the age of twelve years, except one of the girls to wait upon my daughter in law during her life, and then to be returned to my grandchildren with her increase without any charge to then their heirs and assigns forever, and except the girl lent to my daughter in law the rest to be hired out for the use of the children while the time of dividing the same.

Also one-half lot in Beaufort Town known by the number (53) being the north half with the house frame upon the finishing the same.

Also one feather bed and bolster marked A.B., surveyors instruments and my silver headed cane, to him his heirs and assigns forever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto ay son Caleb Bell one tract of land joining and lying above Black Creek on the North side of Newport River which land I bought of Col. Thomas Lovick and George Read formerly belonging to the estate of James Winwright deceased excepting 200 acres of the surplus land contained to the courses of the said patent, the said 200 acres beginning at the corner tree of my Deep Creek land a cypress in Newport Proceation then So. 75 East 100 poles to a pine, then No. 15 E to the head line of the said patent, to him his heirs and assigns forever.

Also my wish and desire is that my son Caleb Bell and Susana his wife shall have the use and service of my five negroes: viz. Dinah, James, Stephen, Esther and Henry, during ay sons natural life and the widowhood of his wife, and then I give and bequeath the said negroes and their increase to my grandchildren the sons and daughters of ay son Caleb Bell to be divided when the youngest child comes to the age of twelve years, except the negro girl Esther to wait upon my daughter in law during her life and then to be returned to my grandchildren with her increase without any charge to them their heirs and assigns forever, and except the girl lent to my daughter in law the rest to be hired out for the use of the children while the time of dividing the same. Also one feather bed and boalster marked "C.B." and one dish.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my son Joseph Bell the tract of land which I bought of Christopher Read called the Hammock on the south side of Newport River except fifty acres of the said land where Joseph Perry did live, the said fifty acres of the land begins at a pine near where the paster fence joins to the head of the gut in the marsh with a line of marsh trees across the road to the head line of the said land I now live on so as to contain the fifty acres. Also half the tract called turpentine neck joining the said Joseph Bells land to him his heirs and assigns forever.

Also my wish and desire is that my son Joseph Bell and Hannah his wife shall have the use and services of the negroes as follow: viz. Tobe, Nan, Abram, Ruth and Willibee, during my sons natural life and his wifes widowhood. Then I give and bequeath unto my grandson Elija Bell my negro boy Abram to him his heirs and assigns forever and likewise I give and bequeath my negroes Tobe, Nan, Ruth and Willibee and their increase to the rest of my son Josephs children to them, sons or daughters, to be equally divided when the youngest comes to the age of twelve years, and in the meantime the said negros Tobe, Nan, Ruth and Willibee to be hired out and their wages to be put to interest for the use of my said grandchildren at the time of dividing the same.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Malachi Bell the tract of land where I now live to him his heirs and assigns forever. Also my will and desire is that my son Malachi Bell and Elizabeth his wife shall have the use and services of the negroes as follows: viz. George, Phillis, Jack, Bett and Rhody and their increase during my sons natural life and his wifes widowhood, and then I give and bequeath the said negroes to my grandchildren the sons and daughters of my son Malachi Bell to be equally divided when the youngest comes to the age of twelve years and in the meantime the said negroes, George, Phillis, Jack, Bett and Rhody to be hired out and their wages to be put to interest for the use of my said grandchildren at the time of dividing the same.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my two sons Caleb and Malachi Bell my tract of land lying on the back of Gales Creek formerly belonging to Col. Thos. Lovick to them their heirs and assigns forever.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my grandson David Bell, son of Church Bell, deceased, on tract of land which I bought of Col. Thos. Lovick and George Read known and distinguished by the name of Deep Creek land on the North side of Newport River formerly belonging to the estate of James Winwright. Also 200 acres that is excepted out of the tract given to my son Caleb Bell, my grandson paying the quit rents of the 200 acres from the date of the said patent.

Also my house and lot in Beaufort Town known by the number (19) with the South half of the lot No. (53) and the house standing on it built for the Registers office, to him his heirs and assigns forever.

Also my negro woman Pegg, my negro woman Joannah, my negro boy Bill and my negro boy Charles and their increases.

And my smith tools of all kinds. One young horse called Spark, two feather beds and boalsters marked “D.B.” and the cattle called his in his own mark. Also my horse. To him and his heirs and assigns forever. Also my desire is that my grandson David Bell have the use of four of the last cowpens to tend for the term of two years that is upon my son Joseph Bells land; and also the third of the enclosed ground on the plantation I now live on to tend for two years and liberty to keep his household goods in part of the house I now live in and to reside in the house during the term of two years if required. And my desire is further the three negro men given to my three sons, Andre, Joseph and Malachi Bell shall assist my grandson David Bell in any work he shall see fit to put them about for the space of two months, provided that my grandson shall request it at such times of the year that the crops of my said sons, Andrew, Joseph and Malachi Bell shall not be damaged thereby. And my desire is further the negro men given to Andrew, Joseph and Malachi Bell shall assist my son Caleb Bell in any work he shall see fit to put them about for the space of two months, provided he shall request it at such times of the year that the crops of my sons shall not be damaged thereby.

Likewise I desire further that my son Caleb shall have the liberty to get cypress timber in the swamp given to my grandson David Bell for his plantation.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Sarah Bell one feather bed and bolster marked “S.B.” and one other (?) trunk.

Also my will and desire is that my three sons, Caleb, Joseph and Malachi Bell receive all my outstanding and pay all my just debts out of my estate.

Also my will and desire is that my four sons Andrew, Caleb, Joseph and Malachi Bell and my grandson David Bell shall have the remainder of my horses, hoggs, cattle, sheep and household goods not before given – equally divided amongst themselves. Provided nevertheless my will and desire is that if any of my sons or grandson, David Bell, die without lawful issue that their part of the land and negroes that I have herein given be equally divided among the rest of my sons and grandson, David Bell, as the case my be, he or their heirs.

And also if the negroes that I made over to Mary Fazackerly in Princess Ann County in Virginia as may appear by a bond now in my house ever return back to my family that then they shall be equally divided among my four sons and my grandson David Bell or their heirs.

Also what small remains of my estate be divided as follows, Viz. My three sons Caleb, Joseph and Malachi shall put a price on each article, both horses, cattle, sheep, hogs, and household goods, and then my grandson, David Bell to take the first choice, and Andrew the next, Caleb, Joseph and Malachi in their place according to their age.

Lastly I nominate and appoint my three sons Caleb, Joseph and Malachi Bell executors of this my last will and testament, revoking and making void all other will or wills heretofore made by me, holding and making this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 15th day of January 1775.

Joseph Bell - Signed, sealed, published and declared to be his last will and testament in the presence of, Elijah Shepard, Thos. Oglesbee and Solomon Shepard, Jr.

I, Joseph Bell, of Carteret County, do this 23 day of April make and publish this codicil to my last will and testament in manner following. That is to say, I give to my son Caleb Bell my horse Dobin and my riding saddle, and I give to my son Malachi Bell my horse called Jack, and likewise I give my grandson David Bell my hand mill, and also give to my grandson Joseph Corbett Bell one young cow and calf now in my pasture, and my mark to be recorded for him after my decease.

Whereas in my last will I have left the use and services of my negroes given to my four sons Andrew, Caleb, Joseph and Malachi Bell to the their wives during their widowhood and one negro to my daughter in law Elizabeth Bell, wife of my son Andrew Bell, during her life, I do hereby order and declare that my will is that only my four daughters in law shall have the use and service of the negroes left to my four sons only for the time of two years or the day of their marriage which shall happen first and no longer, and then the said negroes to be disposed of according to my will.

And lastly it is my desire this present codicil be annexed to and made part of my last will and testament to all intents and purposes in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal.

Signed sealed and published by the said Joseph Bell as a codicil to be annexed to his will in the presence of
John McKeel
Littleton Gasman
Thos Oglesbeo
June Court 1777
 

Will of Caleb Bell
April 1, 1811
Will Book D, p. 90

In the name of God Amen. I, Caleb Bell of Carteret County in the State of North Carolina, being of sound and perfect mind and Memory, Blessed be God, do thin first day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and Eleven stake and publish this my last mill and testament in manner following, that is to say, first that all my Just and Lawful debts be paid as hereafter so Directed.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Jacob Bell that part of my land joining Black Creek, being the eastermost part, beginning at James Wainwright's corner—formerly a pine but now a stake, thence running a westerly course half way to Carters Branch, thence running a northerly course to the back line of said patent, thence easterly along the back line of the patent to Black Creek, thence down the various courses of said Creek to the beginning, the above mentioned land laid off and bounded as aforesaid I give and bequeath unto my said son Jacob Bell, his paying one third part of all my Debts, to him and to his Heirs and assigns forever.

Item. I give unto my son Joseph Cole Bell that part of my land joining Borden's land, being the westernmost part of my land I now live on, beginning at the mouth of the branch where my negro James Cleard a small piece of ground, thence running up the various courses of said Branch to the fork, thence running up the same course of Borden's land to the back line of my said patent, thence along the back line of my said patent to the corner, thence running down along Borden's line one mile, thence to the beginning. All the above mentioned land laid off and bounded as aforesaid I give and bequeath unto my said son Joseph Cole Bell, his paying one third of all ay Debts, to him and to his Heirs and assigns forever.

Item. I give unto my son Caleb Norris Bell that part of my land 1 now live on beginning at the mouth of the branch where my negro James Cleard a small piece of ground at my son's Joseph C. Bell's beginning corner, thence running easterly along the line of said patent to the mouth of Carters Branch, thence running up the middle of said branch to the back line of ay said patent, thence westerly along the line to ay son Joseph C. Bell back corner, thence down his line to the beginning, including ay house and plantation where I now live. The above mentioned land laid off and bounded as aforesaid I give and bequeath unto ay said son Caleb Norris Bell, his paying one third of all my Debts, to his and to his Heirs and assigns forever.

Item. I give unto my two daughters Charlotte Chadwick and Elizabeth Bell that part of ay land lying and being between that I have ay son Jacob and my son Caleb Norris part. The above mentioned I give and bequeath unto my two said daughters Charlotte and Elizabeth, to them and to there Heirs and assigns forever.

I give and bequeath unto my three sons Jacob Bell, Joseph Cole Bell and Caleb Norris Bell my two hundred acres of land lying near the head of Deep Creek called the oak or cypress, they paying all my Just debts, to them and to there Heirs and assigns forever.

Item. I give unto my son William Bell all my black Smith tools and have paid for some land he is now in possession of.

Item. I give unto my grandson Caleb Bell, the son of my son William Bell one heffer and that my son William Church the same.

Item: I give unto my daughter Abigal Chadwick ten Dollars to be raised out of my property. I have already given a great deal of timber unto my son in law Solomon Chadwick.

Item: My desire is that my daughter Charlotte have all the Cattle called hers now in her mark.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth Bell one bed and Furniture called hers, one lenning wheel loom and gier.

Item. I give unto my three sons Jacob Bell, Joseph Cole Bell and Caleb Norris Bell my timber Carriage and Chaul. Also I give unto my three said sons Jacob, Joseph Cole and Caleb Norrie two Stears and two Bulls for Oxen. My will and desire is that my large can—and sell my Tar Kill now in the woods, my cattle not before given, to be sold by my executors to pay my debts. My wish is the Tun timber and plank stock I got for Mr. Ward and Mr. Stanton that they may have had happen I am owing them and my desire is that my property not before given be sold by my Executors to pay my debts.

Lastly My will and desire is that my executors Receive all the Debts due to me and pay and pay all my Just and lawful debts as aforesaid, and I make and ordain my son Jacob Bell, my son Joseph Cole Bell and my son Caleb Norris Bell executors of and to this my last will and testament.

In witness whereof I, the said Caleb Bell, have hereunto set my hand and Seal the year and day above written.
Declared by the said Caleb Bell the
Testator as his last will and Testament in the presence of us
Caleb Bell (Seal)
Joseph Bell
Matthew Pool
Church Bell

Proved June Term 1811 by oath of Church Bell.

The excerpts above were taken from the research of Marybelle Delamar
Raleigh, North Carolina 1946