How Gallant's Point and Gallant's Channel Got Their Names

1709 Map by John Lawson
North of Albemarle Sound - Moseley's 1733 Map
John Galland and his sister Penelope were the step children of Governor Charles Eden. (Originally the name was most likely spelled Golland.)

John, born about 1698, and his sister Penelope, born about 1695, were the children of John Galland (abt. 1677-1704) and Penelope Belchier (abt. 1677-1716).

In 1705, after the death of John and Penelope’s father, their mother Penelope Belchier Galland married Charles Eden, who became the second governor of colonial Carolina in 1713.

Penelope Belchier Galland Eden died 4 January 1716. About 1719, Governor Eden built “Eden House” on Salmon Creek near Chowan River and the “Town on Queen Anne’s Creek.” Charles died of yellow fever in 1722; shortly afterward, the town was renamed Edenton in his honor. At this time, John Galland would have been about 24 and his sister Penelope about 27, then married to William Maule.



John’s sister Penelope Galland (1695-1750) married four times.
1.    Penelope married William Maule about 1710. Maule was Surveyor General of Bertie County, planter, politian and military leader during the Tuscarora War and Cary’s Rebellion. He died in 1726.
2.    Penelope married John Lovick about 1726. Lovick served as a member of Gov. Eden’s Council and, in 1722, inherited much of Eden’s estate including “Eden House.” Lovick died in 1733, leaving Penelope as one of the wealthiest women in the colony.
3.    Penelope married George Phenny about 1734. Phenney was "Surveyor General of His Majesties Customs Southern District on the Continent of America." From 1721 to 1727, Phenney was Governor of the Bahamas. He died in 1737.
4.    Penelope married Gov. Gabriel Johnston about 1740; they lived at “Eden House.” Gabriel Johnston became the longest serving governor in state history, 1734 to 1752. Penelope died in 1750 at “Eden House.”

Moseley Map - 1737
About 1726, Penelope’s brother John Galland, then about 28 years old, received a patent for acreage in Core Sound signed by brother-in-law John Lovick. Galland became clerk of court for Carteret County in 1727; he continued in that position until December 1729 and died in 1730. Part of Galland’s acreage north of Beaufort became known as Galland’s Neck, Gallant’s Point or Gallant’s Creek.



DOCUMENTATION

1857 Gallant's Point
Sep 1727: THIS DAY JOHN GALLAND PRODUCED A COMMISSION FOR CLERK OF THIS COURT WHICH WAS ACCEPTED OF AND THE COURT ADJOURNED TO THE HOUSE OF MR JOHN SHACKLEFORD AT FOUR O CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON.  THE COURT MET ACCORDING TO ADJOURNMENT AND IS NOW SETT.

Jun 1729: IT IS ORDERED THAT MR JOHN GALLAND, CLERK OF OUR COURT FIND US A DINNER ALWAYS THE FIRST COURT DAY AND HAVE THE AMERSMENT FOR HIS TROUBLE.
Aside from his normal duties as Clerk and acknowledging adjournments or various deeds, there is no mention of John Galland Esq. after Dec 1729.  Therefore John Galland died 1730, since the last official act he performed was…

Dec 1729: RICHARD RUSTULL, JOSEPH BELL AND JOHN GALLAND ESQS IN OPEN COURT ACKNOWLEDGED A DEED FOR A LOT IN BEAUFORT TOWN NO 2 IN THE NEW TOWN, UNTO WILLIAM OWINS AND ORDERED TO BE REGISTERED. There was no spring quarter session for 1730.  John Simpson became the succeeding Clerk of Court.

Jun 1730: JOHN SIMPSON CAME INTO OPEN COURT AND PRODUCED A COMMISSION FOR CLERK OF THIS COURT FROM JOHN LOVICK ESQ, SECRETARY. HE TOOK THE OATH ENJOYNED BY LAW FOR QUALIFICATION OF PUBLICK OFFICERS BEFORE ENOCH WARD ESQ.
The Carteret Court abstracts above were compiled by Rebecca Willis Sanders.
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May 1731 – Minutes of the North Carolina Governor’s Council (Colonial and State Records): The Deposition of Mr Richard Russell being first sworn on the Holly Evangelist saith that some time agoe Mr John Galland Brother in Law to Mr Lovick Brought a blank Pattent down to Core sound (as he remembers) without mention of number of acres inserted and a reciept inserted on the back of said Pattent signed by Mr Lovick and the Deponant not approving to have ye sd Pattent filled up but at ye Secretarys office he sent ye same up to ye said office & had the patent perfected.
And further this Deponant saith not

        RICHARD RUSSELL
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In September 1731, Richard Rustull Sr. sold the lot #13 in Beaufort to Mary Galland for £3. Mary was most likely the widow of John Galland.

Rich:d Rustull of Carteret Precinct, Bath County in consideration of £3 current money sells to Mary Galland, a lot of ½ acre in the “town of Port Beaufort” No. 10 [sic], formerly belonging to John Shaw and made over to the grantor. (Original deed (book D pp.95-96): Dated 22 Mar 1730/1, registered Sep 1731) This deed contains a clause that she must build a habitable house on the 20’ by 15’ lot within two years. Witnessed by Jo. Bell and Jm:s Winright. Acknowledged before Jm:s Winright.
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Carteret Court minutes 1731 (Rebecca Willis Sanders' abstract): RICHARD RUSTULL ESQ CAME INTO OPEN COURT AND ACKNOWLEDGED A DEED FOR A LOTT IN BEAUFORT TOWN NUMBER 13 TO MARY GALLAND AND ORDERED TO BE REGISTERED
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Letter from Robert Williams to the NC Council of Safety, 14 Sept 1776 (Colonial and State Records)
...........I think I heard that Gallands Neck was valued being abt 270 Acres at about £270, surely it would not sell for 1/3 of the money exclusive of 3 or 4 Acres the Salt work stands upon, if any more works are made there 10 or 12 Acres would be sufficient for the Country but guess better places may be had hereafter, Although I had Sufficient reason to fix there at the time I began as Tenders with great reason were hourly Expected.

We have cut all the pines that we could find as at foot of the acct, few would have squared 8 Inch at 20 feet long, nor one of them maul into rails, the land for many years past had been constantly Pillaged by the town People. There is a bit of tolerable land where a Plantation formerly was but the chiefest part is only low grassy piney Land with tolerable Clay bottom and no ways preferable to piney land of the kind in Common; only for this disadvantage that it has no trees for turpentine, or rails, nor a knot of lightwood left unpillaged.

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John Galland died at about thirty-two years of age. For the last four years of his life, 
he owned acreage in Beaufort and was clerk of court for Carteret County.

Contemporary Map - Gallant's Point